Citizens of the body? (2)

Usually, we live in harmony with our microscopic residents.  Most stay on the body’s surface.  Under certain conditions, when we are malnourished, exhausted, injured, or if our internal resistance is not up to par and we have subluxations, resident organisms and other microbes may invade and multiply in our tissues, or set forth in the bloodstream  traveling to all parts of the body.  If unchallenged, they can upset the body’s delicate chemistry.  When this happens, the body functions may be compromised.

To keep one’s resistance high requires a good nerve supply.  A good nerve supply is part of the chiropractic objective.

AMAZING ISN’T IT?

20/20  VISION — SEEING YOUR POSSIBILITIES!

Citizens of the body?

We live in a world dense with microbes:  bacteria, virus and fungi abound in the air, water, and soil, and on the living things around us.  Most of these organisms have little interest in the human species.  Yet a specialized few find the human body an inviting habitat:  warm, protected, and well stocked with nutrients.

Some settle in the nose and ears, some on the skin and in the intestinal tract.

AMAZING INS’NT IT?

20/20   VISION  —  SEEING YOUR POSSIBILITIES!

What are some of the residents of the body? (2)

Usually we live in harmony with our microscopic residents.  Most stay on the body’s surfaces.  Under certain conditions, when we are malnourished, exhausted, injured, or under stress causing subluxations, resident organisms and other microbes may invade and multiply in our tissues, or set forth in the bloodstream, traveling to all parts of the body.

If unchallenged, they can cause serious, even fatal afflictions.  Yet, considering the number of interlopers, and thanks to the innate intelligence of the body, this situation rarely occurs.

AMAZING ISN’T IT?

20/20  VISION   —   SEEING YOUR POSSIBILITIES!!!

What are some of the residents of the body?

We live in a world dense with microbes.   Bacteria, virus and fungi abound in the air, water and soil, and on the living things around us.  Most of these organisms have little interest in the human species… just a few specialized ones find the human body an inviting habitat…  warm, protected, and well stocked with nutrients.

Some settle in the nose and ears, some on the skin and the intestinal track.

AMAZING ISN’T IT?

20/20   VISION   —   SEEING YOUR POSSIBILITIES!

Are microbes and germs good for you? (6)

Experience shows that under usual conditions the remnants of animals and plants do not accumulate in nature.  Very rapidly they are consumed by germs and thereby taken through a chain of chemical alterations which break them down step by step into simpler compounds.

The germs themselves eventually die, and their bodies are also transformed by microbial action.  In this manner the constituents of all living things are returned to nature after death to be recycled.  Reduced to simpler forms, they are available for the creation of new microbial and plant life, which is eventually consumed by animals and human beings.

Microbes and germs thus constitute indispensable links in the chain that binds inanimate matter of life.

The innate intelligence that animate the living world, including us, needs no help, just no interference!!!

AMAZING ISN’T IT?

20/20   VISION — SEEING YOUR POSSIBILITIES!

Are microbes and germs good for you? (2)

An other example is that the oxygen we breathe is a product of life.  Oxygen was being released into the atmosphere in a free form by primitive organisms that lived more than two billion years ago according to scientific historians.

It is still being produced by most members of the plant kingdom, by the microscopic algae of ocean plankton as well as by the most gigantic trees.

Microbes and plants are thus absolutely necessary for the existence of animals and human beings, not only as they produce food, also as they literally create a breathable atmosphere.

AMAZING ISN’T IT?

20/20  VISION  —   SEEING YOUR POSSIBILITIES!

Are microbes and germs good for you?

In common usage, the meaning of the word “nature” is rather limited.  It does not refer to planet earth as shaped by cosmic forces, yet almost exclusively to the living forms on which people depend and to the earth’s atmosphere and surface.  The interdependence between human beings and the other forms of life is so complete that the word nature usually has biological connotations, even when referring to inanimate substances.  In practice, we do not live on the planet earth but with the life it harbors and within the environment that life creates.

For examples, microbes, germs and viruses are microscopic and are about 400 times smaller than a surgical mask.  Yet surgeons do wear surgical masks don’t they?

AMAZING ISN’T IT?

20/20   VISION  —  SEEING YOUR POSSIBILITIES!

Is there war?

Within minutes of infection, the innate intelligence of the body summons a wave of neutrophils which arrives at the site, the advance guard of the body’s professional “eating cells”.  Each neutrophil convulsed by the chemical signals sent by the innate intelligence of the body, thrusts a portion of its cell body between the crevices in the blood vessel walls, squeezes through, and slithers toward the microbes.  A struggle ensues.

The bacteria, dodging their attackers, spew powerful toxins that can disable or kill the neutrophils and surrounding cells.  A persistent neutrophil seizes a bacterium and wraps a portion of its own cell membrane around the microbe.  But sucking the membrane inward, deep into its body, the neutrophil creates a miniature sac for its prey.

AMAZING ISN’T IT?

Is there a bug going around?

In the 21st century, it is still a common belief that due to obscure events or bad luck “we catch a cold” or that “there is a bug going around.”

This social programming never stops to amaze me.  In 1976 it was the “swine flu”, 1981 the “asian flu” 1987 the “korean flu”, 1998 the “bird flu” all the way from Hong Kong, recently the “mexican flu” and who knows what the  year 2025 will bring along…

You don’t “catch” a cold nor is the “bug going around” in the sense that the normally virus-free body suddenly becomes overwhelmed by a virulent horde of invading microbes.

Cold viruses are a ubiquitous as the air we breathe.  They live in the healthy mouth, sinuses and throat tissues, which usually protect the body from viral attack.  The tissues are coved with microscopic hairs called cilia and a thin blanket of mucus.  The moist mucus traps the virus particle, like flypaper, and its mildly acidic chemical composition blocks their reproduction long enough for the cilia to sweep them into the stomach where powerful digestive acids kill them.

The micro-ecology of the healthy throat also involves subtle interactions between body temperature and blood flow that reinforce the area’s anti-viral mission.

Amazing isn’t it?